Episode 25

Felix Oberholzer-Gee: Simplifying strategy for the better

Strategy is a mystery to many of us. It’s an over-used, misunderstood term in business. Put simply, a strategy is a plan to create value. Don’t start with profit though. That’s the result of strategy. Instead, use a ‘value stick’ which provides a way of measuring the two fundamental forces that lead to value creation and increased financial success: (1) the customer’s willingness to pay; and (2) the employee’s willingness to sell their services to the business.

Companies that ‘win’, according to Felix Oberholzer-Gee, create value for customers by raising their willingness-to-pay and they provide value for talent by lowering their willingness-to-sell. He describes how to do this in this fascinating discussion, talking about the distinction between the creation and capture of value, the potential of ’near-customers’, strategy in ecosystems, the power of value-maps and the relationship between strategy and culture.

The best bits of these conversations are captured in my newsletter Flashes+Sparks.

Further resources

Felix Oberholzer-Gee is the Andreas Andresen Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy Unit at Harvard Business School. He currently teaches competitive strategy in executive education programs such as the Program for Leadership Development, the Senior Executive Program for China and in a program for media executives titled Effective Strategies for Media Companies. He hosts the HBR After Hours podcast, in which he discusses and debates current events that sit at the crossroads of business and culture with fellow HBS professors Youngme Moon and Mihir Desai.

VIEW RUNNING ORDER

03.37 Definition of strategy.
05.24 Why strategy is a confusing term.
07.56 The importance of differentiation.
09.54 Are we over-emphasising business models?
14.00 Customer delight.
16.26 The relationship between strategy and culture.
19.13 Near customers.
23.15 Value maps.
25.39 Ecosystems.
30.39 Strategy process that works.
34.04 Applying his own framework.

“Select the one or two value drivers where you beat the competition hands down. That’s where the creativity starts.”

Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Steve Blank: Reinventing entrepreneurship

Steve Blank: Reinventing entrepreneurship

Janice Lintz: Advocating for access

Janice Lintz: Advocating for access

Roger Martin: Thinking afresh about business

Roger Martin: Thinking afresh about business

Bill Fischer: The myths and magic of innovation

Bill Fischer: The myths and magic of innovation

Paul Leinwand and Matt Mani: Rethinking leadership beyond digital

Paul Leinwand and Matt Mani: Rethinking leadership beyond digital

Katy Milkman: How can you change for the better? And stick at it?

Katy Milkman: How can you change for the better? And stick at it?

Felix Oberholzer-Gee: Simplifying strategy for the better

Felix Oberholzer-Gee: Simplifying strategy for the better

Alisa Cohn: Making the shift from start-up founder to world-class CEO

Alisa Cohn: Making the shift from start-up founder to world-class CEO

Michael Bungay Stanier: How to start doing something that matters

Michael Bungay Stanier: How to start doing something that matters

©2022 David Lancefield Ventures Limited. Privacy policy.
Designed by Gibson.

Share This